RIP Gerbil

Don Zimmer, who spent 65 years in professional baseball, never had a job outside of the game. If that’s not living a dream I don’t know what is.

Here’s one of Zim’s more animated moments, as third base coach for the Little Bears, arguing a home run call (just past 2 min. mark). He gets so agitated he has to stop and catch his breath. Bonus: A cogent Harry Caray narrates.

 

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3 comments

  1. RIP…. he will be missed. I swear I thought he was older than 83. During the Yankees-sawx fight of 03, Joe Buck announced his age as 72, I was shocked. He always looked 60 plus and I remember him managing Texas and San Diego when I was a kid in the 70s.

  2. Lived the dream indeed; got paid his whole life to play in / manage baseball games. RIP Don…

  3. Back when I was a kid in 1963, I’d always go grocery shopping with my mom, because I could usually get her to buy me a couple of packs of Topps Baseball Bubblegum (back when they were 5 cents a pack for 5 cards and a slab of Bazooka). But I remember one time she said no and that if I wanted any, I’d have to buy them myself. I searched my pockets, found one lousy nickel, and bought a pack.

    Because it was going to have to last me awhile, I waited until we got home to open it. Top card in the pack: Don Zimmer, 3B-2B, L.A. Dodgers. Well, this was a mixed blessing; I previously didn’t have that card, so that was good, but I knew enough about him to know he wasn’t very good, so that wasn’t so good. Next card in the pack: Don Zimmer. Third card: Don Zimmer. Fourth, fifth cards: Don Zimmer. I went from no Don Zimmers to quintuplets of the bum in one exceedingly lousy pack! And I wasn’t going to get any more baseball cards until the next time my mom went grocery shopping.

    The next time we were at the store, my mom bought me the usual couple or three packs of cards, so it wasn’t nearly as horrible when one of them contained only 3 Don Zimmers. And I never again got a pack of Topps with even two of the same card in it, or, for that matter, another 1963 Don Zimmer.

    I always wanted to share that story with Zim; I figured he’d have found it amusing.

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