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The 20 worst A-Braves players: #4 Melky Cabrera

I’m not going to try and convince you that Melky Cabrera was worse than, say, Sugar Bear Blanks. But there were few Braves as lazy and ineffectual as Wide Leche.

When the Braves acquired Cabrera I was under the delusion that he was one of those players you appreciate the more you saw play, a guy who would fill in capably all over the outfield, steal a few bases, hit a few homers, et al.

Instead the Cabrera we saw was out of shape, a liability on defense, punchless at the plate and a clod on the bases. And he didn’t seem to give a damn.

Granted, Melky probably would not be on this list if not for his antics last July at The Ted.

CD posted about it the day after, demonstrating some rare prescience:

The guy acts like he’s going to toss baseballs to the fans, and then doesn’t. Like some smart ass 13-year-old, he taunts Heyward to run to third. He cadillacs out of the box after hitting a ball that nearly scraped the top of the wall on its way out. …

Of course, never mind that he has decided to take the game seriously only after being in the big leagues for several years. I hope he blows a hammy or loses 100 points off his batting average by the end of the season. Maybe he’ll get busted for ‘roids. I wouldn’t be surprised.

Who we missing?

Only four players to go in our countdown of the 20 worst players (non-pitchers) in A-Braves history. Two of the four spots are taken, and it shouldn’t be hard to figure out who they are (hint: they played the positions most popular on our list). The other two are up for grabs.

Now’s your last chance to make a case for the worst of the worst.

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The 20 worst A-Braves players: #5 Rob Belloir

Rob Belloir was acquired from Cleveland in 1975, a bad sign, as the Indians were the AL version of the Braves. He was the PTBNL in a deal that brought Blue Moon Odom to Atlanta — a trade Eddie Robinson would’ve been better off not making. Blue Moon was 1-7 with a 7.07 ERA in his one season as a Brave. Belloir was just as bad.

What else would you expect from a lifetime .246 hitter in the minors?

Pretty much what Belloir produced — or didn’t — in parts of four seasons as a Brave. His was a career of attrition, as the utility infielder’s appearances dwindled with each year. By the time it was over, in 1978, Belloir had 167 MLB AB’s and only 36 hits — 30 of which were singles. He hit no homers and stole no bases.

You’d assume, then, that Belloir could pick it, but you’d be wrong. He appeared in 38 games at SS as a rookie, committing 12 errors. The Mercer alum retired with a .927 fielding percentage,