From euphoria to disbelief

A little tardy on two anniversaries of note.

Twenty years ago yesterday, we danced in the streets:

Fifteen years ago Friday, we cursed the name Eric Gregg:

About these ads

14 Comments on From euphoria to disbelief

  1. This inspired me to get Skip’s call as a ring tone, which will be reserved for my friend who’s a Mets fan. And for Eric Gregg if he ever calls me from Hell.

  2. Jack Straw // October 14, 2012 at 6:56 pm //

    Anyone ever come up with a credible explanation for what Eric Gregg did that day? A week later, he removed himself from a World Series game, I think.

  3. PepeFreeUs // October 14, 2012 at 7:22 pm //

    That game should’ve been stopped in the 5th inning and that fool forcibly removed from the field of play. It’s still a blot on the sport’s history.

  4. http://archives.citypaper.net/articles/082699/feat.cov1.shtml

    Sitting at the Big Bar, puffing his cigar, Gregg admits that he would take back his call on Hernandez’s last strikeout.

    As for the other 14 ….

  5. Viva Rufino Linares! // October 14, 2012 at 8:02 pm //

    Can listen to Skip’s call all day long. I can’t even look at the screen capture from You Tube showing the shittness that was Eric Gregg.

  6. If they are allowed to play baseball in Hell, I am sure Eric Gregg is the umpire. I wonder how much money he made betting on the Marlins that game.

  7. I never liked his pathetic ass, but anyone who thinks he wasn’t in something illegal up to his eyeballs that night needs their head checked. That was ridiculous. Way beyond simply telling hitters to adjust their strike zone. I remember that night like it was yesterday. I also remember laughing when he walked off the job then MLB gave everyone their job back but him.

  8. PepeFreeUs // October 15, 2012 at 1:40 am //

    I think that game was a real catalyist for Alderson and (yes, I have to say it) Selig and their plan to get those assholes under control. Unfortunately, they eventually blinked and all they really accomplished was getting rid of some of the worst ones (Kosc and Kaiser.)

    The fact that Froemming was allowed to return and continue to embarrass himself and the whole game for another decade, not to mention that vile clod Davidson and all of the other lesser “lights” of wretched umpiring like Gary Darling, just undercut it all. They’ve still got the same shitty attitudes and they’re still trained in all of the wrong techniques by all of the same shitty miscreants they always have been. Unless and until it’s ripped out by the roots and started all over, this problem will never get better.

    But if it keeps resulting in the Yankees getting screwed in October and Girardi whining like a rusty hinge…maybe it’s not all bad.

  9. And don’t forget Bill Hohn.

  10. Viva Rufino Linares! // October 15, 2012 at 10:10 am //

    I was trying to think of Hohn after the Holbrook call. There is a long list of umps who have stuck it to the Bravos.

  11. rankin' rob // October 15, 2012 at 2:48 pm //

    replace them with machines

  12. I never saw that infamous 97 game, but always heard about it. I have never seem a video of it until now. Maybe its best I didnt see it then. I would have broken my TV. I am surprised more players didnt get tossed for arguing the calls. You know some people argue about close calls, but those weren’t even in the realm of close.

  13. PepeFreeUs // October 15, 2012 at 10:30 pm //

    Mike, it was about the most frustratingthing I’ve ever witnessed in the realm of sports. The ’84 Padres game was the maddest I’ve ever been and there have been quick shocks on individual game turning plays but that was like a slow motion car wreck.

    As the day went on, he got more and more into the crowd cheering and it just kept getting more and more ridiculous. It was sickening. I remember Chipper talking about how frustrating it was becuse they essentially weren’t allowed to do their jobs because some fool inserted himself where he didn’t belong.

  14. Like Mike Jolly, I never saw the game (I was living in Japan at the time), and that might have been the first time I’ve seen what Gregg was using as a strike zone. I can’t blame Hernandez for throwing pitches out there as long as Gregg was calling them strikes. Hernandez was literally unhittable, which is to say that the strikes Gregg was calling were so far out of the strike zone that a hitter could not reach them while maintaining a two-handed grip on the bat. I assume that the Braves’ pitchers weren’t getting the same calls. A ridiculously wide strike zone is bad enough, but an inconsistently wide strike zone is even worse.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 287 other followers

%d bloggers like this: